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Posts tagged fw 1998.

Removal* of the bald plates at Alexander McQueen F/W 1998 ‘Joan’

slentando:

debra shaw for alexander mcqueen

slentando:

debra shaw for alexander mcqueen

[ALEXANDER MCQUEEN A/W 98]

11.02.13 ♥ 1405

the-widows-of-culloden:

Alexander McQueen AW 1998 "Joan"


Inspired by the murders of Joan of Arc and of the Romanov family, Alexander McQueen’s Fall 1998 show took on a dark, sinister feeling. Models had peroxide blonde hair worn in medieval-inspired styles (sans eyebrows), and sported blood-red contact lenses. The collection itself was very tough; tailored, sequined, patterned with prints of the Romanov children. In keeping with the Joan of Arc theme, several models wore dresses of chainmail, and the color palette featured blood red, black, and silver. His signature tartan was present, and the red lace dress covering the face was worn by Lady Gaga at the MTV awards a decade later. There were even pieces of armor, as shown above in the fourth figure. It was the finale of the show, however, that would garner the most attention. The final model, wearing a beaded red dress that covered her face, was encircled in a ring of fire (a direct reference to Joan of Arc, who was burned a the stake). She writhed and moved around as the fire grew.

In the words of Andrew Bolton: 

"The finale of this particular collection involved a woman walking down the runway styled like molten ash that has solidified. And at the end of it, she had centered herself on the catwalk and a ring of fire sprung up around her. The collection itself had many references to Joan of Arc—garments that were made out of chainmail, but also garments inspired by menswear. Joan of Arc was famous for contravening the conventions of gender in her dress. McQueen rarely used supermodels, beyond Kate Moss. He preferred models who were not that well known, or if they were, he liked disguising their features on the runway with treatments that in a way obliterated their identities. So this particular piece is quite typical of McQueen in terms of the fact that it is covering her face. We are totally unaware of who the actual model is. He did really want the artist to focus more on the artistry of the clothes, rather than the identity of the model."

09.15.13 ♥ 196

Alexander McQueen Fall/Winter 1998 ‘Joan’

"McQueen didn’t really have muses. He was often inspired by women throughout history—people like Catherine the Great, Marie Antoinette, and in this case Joan of Arc. He liked women who he called “doomed women.” The finale of this particular collection involved a woman walking down the runway styled like molten ash that has solidified. And at the end of it, she had centered herself on the catwalk and a ring of fire sprung up around her. He preferred models who were not that well known, or if they were, he liked disguising their features on the runway with treatments that in a way obliterated their identities. So this particular piece is quite typical of McQueen in terms of the fact that it is covering her face. We are totally unaware of who the actual model is. He did really want the artist to focus more on the artistry of the clothes, rather than the identity of the model.” 

08.15.13 ♥ 3479
1998 Fall/Winter

1998 Fall/Winter

04.17.13 ♥ 21
1998 Fall/Winter

1998 Fall/Winter

02.15.13 ♥ 8
shoulderblades:

shirley mallmann at alexander mcqueen fall/winter 1998 ‘joan’

shoulderblades:

shirley mallmann at alexander mcqueen fall/winter 1998 ‘joan’

1998 Fall/Winter

1998 Fall/Winter

10.24.12 ♥ 14

itlot:

joan

alexander mcqueen 1998

photo by anne deniau

10.15.12 ♥ 1001
1998 Fall/Winter

1998 Fall/Winter

08.25.12 ♥ 17

hauten:

Joan of Arc, Alexander McQueen F/W 1998

1998 Fall/Winter

1998 Fall/Winter

06.08.12 ♥ 9

witchesandslippersandhoods:

Alexander McQueen F/W 1998

05.19.12 ♥ 122
1998 Fall/Winter

1998 Fall/Winter

04.04.12 ♥ 15